Research.Biomaterials History

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October 06, 2011, at 04:30 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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This work uses molecular force measurements to quantify molecular level relationships between surface chemistry and the interfacial forces that control biomaterial interactions with proteins and cells. These precision tools elucidated molecular bases of biomaterial surface properties, defined molecular design rules for tuning the properties of biosensor surfaces, and identified design criteria for stealthy drug carriers. Applications of this work include  [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11217749|biosensors]], neutral [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bi992095r|polymer coatings]] for drug carriers, [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la048363q|muco-adhesive coatings]] for orally delivered drug carriers, and thermo-responsive smart polymer coatings for tissue engineering.
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This work uses molecular force measurements to quantify molecular level relationships between surface chemistry and the interfacial forces that control biomaterial interactions with proteins and cells. These precision tools elucidated molecular bases of biomaterial surface properties, defined design rules for biosensor surfaces, and identified design criteria for stealthy drug carriers. Applications of this work include  [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11217749|biosensors]], neutral [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bi992095r|polymer coatings]] for drug carriers, [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la048363q|muco-adhesive coatings]] for orally delivered drug carriers, and thermo-responsive smart polymer coatings for tissue engineering.
October 06, 2011, at 04:29 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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At a more fundamental level, we use molecular force measurements to quantify relationships between surface chemistry and the interfacial forces that control biomaterial interactions with biomolecules and cells. These precision tools elucidated molecular bases of biomaterial surface properties and defined molecular level design rules for tuning the properties of biologically active surfaces. Applications of this work include surface design criteria for [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11217749|biosensors]], neutral [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bi992095r|polymer coatings]] for drug carriers, [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la048363q|muco-adhesive coatings]] for orally delivered drug carriers, and thermo-responsive smart polymer coatings.
to:
This work uses molecular force measurements to quantify molecular level relationships between surface chemistry and the interfacial forces that control biomaterial interactions with proteins and cells. These precision tools elucidated molecular bases of biomaterial surface properties, defined molecular design rules for tuning the properties of biosensor surfaces, and identified design criteria for stealthy drug carriers. Applications of this work include  [[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11217749|biosensors]], neutral [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bi992095r|polymer coatings]] for drug carriers, [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la048363q|muco-adhesive coatings]] for orally delivered drug carriers, and thermo-responsive smart polymer coatings for tissue engineering.
October 06, 2011, at 04:26 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties of materials control biomacromolecule and cell functions, particularly in the context of composite materials that embed biological components. Examples include biomaterials, sensors, targeted drug carriers, and functionalized nanoparticles. Water-soluble polymers are widely used as biocompatible coatings for contact lenses and drug carriers, for example. "Smart" polymers have broad utility because environmental stimuli (temperature, pH) trigger dramatic changes in their interfacial properties. These switchable materials are used for targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensors.

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is a thermally responsive "smart" polymer that binds cells and proteins above 32C, but reversibly releases them at lower temperature.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the polymer chains. We are also identifying molecular level design parameters for thin coatings that reversibly release intact cell sheets for tissue engineering applications. This research is directly relevant to [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering.
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We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties of materials control biomacromolecule and cell functions, particularly in the context of composite materials that embed biological components. Examples include biomaterials, sensors, targeted drug carriers, and functionalized nanoparticles. We are particularly interested in "Smart" polymers that undergo dramatic changes in their interfacial properties in response to environmental stimuli (temperature, pH).  Several clinical applications exploit this switching, and we are exploring how those interfacial changes impinge on function of immobilized proteins and nonspecific protein and cell adsorption.

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is a thermally responsive "smart" polymer that binds cells and proteins above 32C, but reversibly releases them at lower temperature.  This material is used for targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensing.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the polymer chains. We are also identifying molecular level design parameters for thin coatings that reversibly release intact cell sheets for tissue engineering applications. Our work addressed applications in [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering.
October 06, 2011, at 04:20 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties control biomacromolecule and cell functions, particularly in the context of composite materials that embed biological components. Water-soluble polymers are widely used as biocompatible coatings for contact lenses and drug carriers, for example. "Smart" polymers have broad utility because environmental stimuli (temperature, pH) trigger dramatic changes in their interfacial properties. These switchable materials are used for targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensors.
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We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties of materials control biomacromolecule and cell functions, particularly in the context of composite materials that embed biological components. Examples include biomaterials, sensors, targeted drug carriers, and functionalized nanoparticles. Water-soluble polymers are widely used as biocompatible coatings for contact lenses and drug carriers, for example. "Smart" polymers have broad utility because environmental stimuli (temperature, pH) trigger dramatic changes in their interfacial properties. These switchable materials are used for targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensors.
October 06, 2011, at 04:19 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is a thermally responsive "smart" polymer that binds cells and proteins above 32C, but reversibly releases them at lower temperature.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the polymer chains. We are exploring design parameters for thin coatings used to reversibly release intact cell sheets in different tissue engineering applications. Our studies are directly relevant to [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering.
to:
Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is a thermally responsive "smart" polymer that binds cells and proteins above 32C, but reversibly releases them at lower temperature.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the polymer chains. We are also identifying molecular level design parameters for thin coatings that reversibly release intact cell sheets for tissue engineering applications. This research is directly relevant to [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering.
October 06, 2011, at 04:17 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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Surface chemistry and microfabrication tools are used to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the micro-environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  We can precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. In one area of research, we use these platforms to determine how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, and to study the interplay between adhesion proteins and soluble factors regulate cell functions such as migration and differentiation. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging applications in the clinic and in basic biological science. 
 
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Surface chemistry and microfabrication tools are used to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the micro-environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  We can precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. We demonstrated how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, for example. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging applications in the clinic and in basic biological science
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We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties control biomacromolecule and cell interactions with materials. Water-soluble polymers are widely used as biocompatible, nonfouling coatings for contact lenses and drug carriers, for example. "Smart" or "environmentally responsive" polymers have broad utility because environmental stimuli (temperature, pH) trigger dramatic changes in their interfacial properties. These switchable materials have widespread uses in targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensors.

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is an example of a class of thermally responsive "smart" polymers. Above the lower critical solution temperature of 32C the polymer binds proteins, cells, and tissues, but releases them upon decreasing the temperature.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the grafted chains and determining the consequences of this polymer phase behavior in different tissue engineering applications. Our studies are directly relevant to [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering. Current research is determining molecular design rules that control the thermal reversibility of protein and cell adsorption to these coatings.
to:
We have a long-standing interest in determining how interfacial properties control biomacromolecule and cell functions, particularly in the context of composite materials that embed biological components. Water-soluble polymers are widely used as biocompatible coatings for contact lenses and drug carriers, for example. "Smart" polymers have broad utility because environmental stimuli (temperature, pH) trigger dramatic changes in their interfacial properties. These switchable materials are used for targeted drug delivery, reversible cell or protein capture, cell sheet engineering, and biosensors.

Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM) is a thermally responsive "smart" polymer that binds cells and proteins above 32C, but reversibly releases them at lower temperature.  We are determining how this thermal transition depends on the [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531502|molecular weight and density]] of the polymer chains. We are exploring design parameters for thin coatings used to reversibly release intact cell sheets in different tissue engineering applications. Our studies are directly relevant to [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la061577i|targeted drug delivery]] and tissue engineering.
October 06, 2011, at 04:09 PM by 130.126.230.170 -
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Surface chemistry and microfabrication tools are used to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the micro-environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  We can precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. In one area of research, we use these platforms to determine how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, and to study the interplay between adhesion proteins and soluble factors regulate cell functions such as migration and differentiation. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging implications in the clinic and in basic biological science. 
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Surface chemistry and microfabrication tools are used to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the micro-environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  We can precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. In one area of research, we use these platforms to determine how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, and to study the interplay between adhesion proteins and soluble factors regulate cell functions such as migration and differentiation. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging applications in the clinic and in basic biological science. 
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We use surface chemistry and microfabrication tools to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  By combining surface chemistry with microfabrication, we precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. Our goal is to use these platforms to determine how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, and to study the interplay between adhesion proteins and soluble factors in regulating cell polarity and migration. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and we demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging implications in both basic biological science and clinical applications
to:
Surface chemistry and microfabrication tools are used to modify surfaces with precisely tailored chemical and biochemical properties.  These platforms enable us to determine how the micro-environment modulates cell functions at a level that is virtually impossible to achieve in vivo.  We can precisely control the spatial distribution and concentration fields of biochemical factors seen by cells, and the local [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la062738l|mechanical environment]]. In one area of research, we use these platforms to determine how chemotactic and adhesive molecules control cell migration and signaling, and to study the interplay between adhesion proteins and soluble factors regulate cell functions such as migration and differentiation. Ongoing research is determining how cells integrate these different signals to regulate cell functions. For example, we recently determined how different adhesion proteins cooperate to regulate tumor [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la901109e|cell motility]], and demonstrated how adhesive gradients [[http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/la0531493|direct cell migration]].  The information obtained from these studies has wide ranging implications in the clinic and in basic biological science
August 13, 2010, at 01:04 PM by 130.126.231.65 -
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[[http://www.surfaces.org | Surfaces in Biomaterials Foundation]]
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[[http://www.surfaces.org | Surfaces in Biomaterials Foundation]]

[[http://biointerphases.org | BioInterphases Journal
]]
August 13, 2010, at 01:01 PM by 130.126.231.65 -
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 '''MICRO-FABRICATED CELL ENVIRONMENTS'''./

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'''MICRO-FABRICATED CELL ENVIRONMENTS'''

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August 13, 2010, at 12:59 PM by 130.126.231.65 -
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%lfloat height=200px%http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~leckband/uploads/Research/CellFluidics.jpg '''MICRO-FABRICATED CELL ENVIRONMENTS'''.
 
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%lfloat height=200px%http://www.scs.uiuc.edu/~leckband/uploads/Research/CellFluidics.jpg '''MICRO-FABRICATED CELL ENVIRONMENTS'''.
August 13, 2010, at 12:55 PM by 130.126.231.65 -
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'''POLYMER COATINGS AND SMART MATERIALS'''.%rfloat height=150px%http://scs.uiuc.edu/~leckband/uploads/Research/Biomaterials/PNIPAM.jpg 
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'''POLYMER COATINGS AND SMART MATERIALS'''.%rfloat height=150px%PNIPAM.jpg 
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August 06, 2010, at 11:06 AM by 130.126.231.65 -
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Page last modified on October 06, 2011, at 04:30 PM